Shibori Techniques and Pronunciations

A visual dictionary of techniques. The Japanese pronunciations will be added soon.

For detailed instruction on techniques see Jane’s book ‘Stitched Shibori’. Why not book into her interactive zoom courses ‘Shibori Stream’ – You can read the reviews by students  and see her students’ members gallery.

Exploring shibori techniques

Stitched Shibori

Resists can be created by pulling up the threads of prepared hand stitched fabric. Any number of looks can be achieved and floral, organic, geometric patterns and textures are all within the realms of hand stitching. On a single layer of fabric hira-nui shibori can produce shibori ‘drawings’, designs or linear patterns and can be used to create sugi-nui stripes. Working on folded fabric with hishaki-nui stitching which drifts away from and then back to the fold, differing symmetrical shapes occur to form linear patterns. A more considered approach results in many variations of Hinode, the Sunrise pattern. Compositions can be created with ori-nui shibori which is also traditionally used to create the marvellous Tatewaku pattern of undulating lines.

ADVANCED STITCHED TECHNIQUES

Advanced stitched shibori techniques include a range of miru shibori shapes and the circle is used in various placements for Karamatsu, the Japanese larch pattern. The ori-nui technique is further developed to produce elliptical awase nui shibori and another development which brightens the resist is kamiate shibori. Both approaches can be used for the complex shippō-tsunagi pattern of linked circles. Any number of renditions can bring about exciting new motifs.

Hira-nui shibori

Hira-nui shibori

Single rows of stitching look dramatic on dark indigo.

Hira-nui shibori

Shishige-nui shibori

Another name for hira-nui shibori.

Mokume shibori

Mokume shibori

The woodgrain pattern also resembles water.

Kawari mokume shibori

Diamonds and chevrons appear.

Sugi-nui shibori

Sugi-nui shibori

Controlled stitching brings about stripes.

Ori-nui shibori

Ori-nui shibori

A technique to ‘draw’ with or to surround shapes.

Hinode shibori

Hinode

A repeat pattern evoking sunset and sunrise.

Hishaki-nui shibori

Parrellel undulating row or rows on the fold axis create symmetrical shapes.

Tatewaku shibori

Tatewaku

Varied undulating patterns are used in many cultures.

Awase-nui shibori

Awase-nui

Can be used as a broad border or as a much finer stripe.

Awase-nui

The elliptical format is used traditionally for the linked circle pattern.

Kamiate shibori

Kamiate shibori

A brighter resist is given to awase-nui.

Shippo-tsunagi

A linked circle pattern. Image courtesy of John Ruddy.

Miru shibori

Miru shibori

Symmetrical motifs can be worked large or small scale.

Karamatsu shibori

Karamatsu shibori

Repeated circles create the Japanese Larch pattern.

Maki-nui shibori

Maki-nui shibori

This stitch will result in a feathered look resist.

Guntai shibori

Guntai shibori

Regimented placements created this ‘Military’ shibori.

Maki-age shibori

Maki-age shibori

Shapes have a radiating criss-cross infill pattern.

Shirokage shibori

Shirokage

A technique that brings about a bright, summery look.

Binding

This group of techniques must surely have been the first to appear in many countries. It  includes the ever popular bound motif of tie-dye. Resists are creating by binding around a plucked up section of fabric with a fine strong thread.  The simplest method would produce the delightful ne maki shibori motif – the tiny thread resisted ring. In Kyoto, a sophisticated method was developed to produce numerous types of tiny dots which can be referred to in general terms as kanoko shibori.  In this binding section we also find maki-age shiboria technique that combines stitching with binding.

Advanced binding techniques

The essence of the technique is carried through to shin eri, binding to a central core such as rope, or a wooden dowel where it can also include boshi methods. Also bomaki shibori.

Ne maki shibori

Ne-maki shibori

These thread resisted rings add a delicate touch.

Ne-maki shibori

Several, carefully placed.

Kanoko shibori

Techniques were developed in Kyoto for pattern & texture. Closely placed.

Kanoko shibori

Different sized dots are spaciously placed.

Kobōshi

Tiny white dots bring a lightness of touch to designs.

Chubōshi

Medium sized capped shapes look bold on a dark background.
Kumo shibori

Kumo shibori

The ever popular tie-dye motif can be given many different looks.

Maki-age shibori

Controlled shapes can be organic, figurative and geometric.